Cedarhurst Mansion

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The Cedarhurst Mansion Estate was originally built in 1823 by Stephen Ewing. While visiting the house, a relative, Sally Carter, died of a short illness at the mansion in 1837. The first reports of a haunting was around 1919 after a teenage boy who slept at the house had a dream about her tombstone falling over. Other family members laughed it off, but an inspection of her burial plot revealed it indeed had fallen over due to stormy weather. People who previously slept and lived in the mansion reported seeing her ghost watching over them as they rested, while other reported hearing and seeing her walking around the house and its grounds. Voices have been heard, and electrical appliances and other articles have been tampered with or inexplicably stopped working. This includes furniture being moved around and pillows being removed and scattered throughout the house. Doors opened and closed of their own accord, and smaller items were frequently broken or went missing. The house now serves as the clubhouse for a gated community, but people still report seeing the ghost of Sally Carter around the Cedarhurst Mansion.

(Submitted by Callum Swift)

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Geographic Information

Address:
Southall Drive Southeast
Huntsville, AL
United States

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GPS:
34.7070305981565, -86.5677424371188
County:
Madison County, Alabama
Nearest Towns:
Huntsville, AL (1.9 mi.)
Redstone Arsenal, AL (4.8 mi.)
Moores Mill, AL (9.9 mi.)
Meridianville, AL (10.0 mi.)
Madison, AL (10.3 mi.)
Owens Cross Roads, AL (10.3 mi.)
Gurley, AL (10.9 mi.)
Triana, AL (12.6 mi.)
Paint Rock, AL (13.9 mi.)
Harvest, AL (14.6 mi.)

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Comments (2)

  1. bpatterson38449@yahoo.com  |  

    Won’t to no if we can investagate this place.we are from ardmore tn.southernghost hunters.we have the old hospital in fayetteville tn.its only 5 of us and would love to investagate your place.call me 9312920256 bobby patterson

    • Scott Spencer  |  

      The answer is “no.” It is in a Gated Neighborhood with a Security Guard on duty 24/7. Only residents are allowed through the gate. It is said that Sally Carter, who died there, died either from illness, a fall down the stairs or she was murdered. (Someone can’t keep their story straight. That was my first clue.) After several reports of vandalism, her casket exhumed and reburied over in Maple Hill Cemetery. I went by the cemetery in an attempt to find out where her grave was. The Office had no record of her being buried there. (This was my second clue.) The Office Lady then assisted me in contacting the city for birth, death and burial records of Sally Carter.
      There were absolutely NONE. That was my third and final clue.
      Sally Carter simply never existed. Her ghost story is a Hoax.

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