Agnews Insane Asylum Site

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In the Great Earthquake of 1906, over 100 patients were killed and buried on this site. The hospital itself was said to be a place full of negative residual energy from shock treatment leaving the patients catatonic. Guests have been shoved and report the feeling of being watched. Objects have also manipulated themselves to move around.

(Submitted by Chris Berglund)

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Geographic Information

Address:
1250 Hope Dr
Santa Clara, CA 95054
United States

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GPS:
37.4010223, -121.95318070000002
County:
Santa Clara County, California
Nearest Towns:
Milpitas, CA (3.2 mi.)
Santa Clara, CA (3.2 mi.)
Sunnyvale, CA (5.1 mi.)
San Jose, CA (5.3 mi.)
Burbank, CA (5.5 mi.)
Buena Vista, CA (5.9 mi.)
Fruitdale, CA (6.3 mi.)
Cupertino, CA (6.9 mi.)
Mountain View, CA (7.2 mi.)
Alum Rock, CA (7.3 mi.)

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Comments (13)

  1. I was walking toward hospital, and suddenly heard a noise, me n my friend and i were confused and looked toward the sound (it was coming from the church). We started walking toward the sound, and then we heard what sounded like a man yelling HELP or HEY, not sure which, but seconds later i heard a door slam shut… fuckin spooked

  2. My great grandparents (maternal paternal side) were committed in 1920. My great grandfather was James Alvin Hall – he went by James, Jim or Alvin. He died of a “heart attack” in 1934. His entrance records show he had a complete break with reality. My great grandmother, Lottie May Jess, died in 1938 of “angina” – most likely from too many shock treatments. Anyone who investigates, see if you get any responses on your EVP’s from them.

  3. I lived across the street on Bassett for several years and not only was my house haunted it was a scary experience going through the grounds of Agnews.

    After WW2 many scientists came to the Bay Area with full amnesty. Many were specialists in rockets and many were in mental “health” under Project Paperclip. My gf used to walk through there and here music coming from the maintenance area. At night steam would come up through the sewer grates (no other place in Santa Clara did that).

    Now after most of it closed, the county opened up a homeless shelter there. and of course they put it in the building with all the round rooms. The doors used to fly open, hear screams at night and if you sat outside, you could see literally see beings running left and right in the abandoned buildings. And our building had swastikas embedded in the steps of this place.

    I really want to know what the employees have seen and what the homeowners next door are experiencing

  4. Agnews State Hospital, originally known as the “Great Asylum for the Insane,” finished construction in 1888 at a cost of around $750,000. Located in the area known at the time as Agnew Station, Agnews State Hospital was the premier California institution for assisting and treating the mentally ill. The hospital pumped $135,000 annually into the community purchasing local supplies and paying wages to its employees. The architecture of the Agnews’ buildings were designed to not only provide efficient practical patient care as it had claimed, but also to ensure good health and a positive state of mind by designing all rooms to be exposed to the afternoon winds and to be lit by natural light.

    Damage to the Agnews Asylum after the 1906 earthquake.

    Yet, early in the morning on April 18, 1906, residents of the whole San Francisco Bay Area awoke to a violent earthquake. While the destruction to San Francisco is well known, other cities like San José received a great amount of damage and loss of life. The downtown district was hit particularly hard with the near destruction of a dozen or so buildings, including: St. Patrick’s Cathedral, the Phelan building, and the Elks Hall and stores in the heart of downtown. The greatest loss of life in the area however was at the hospital, where the 11 officials and 101 patients perished. News sources from the time stoked a little bit of fear by claiming that, “a number of insane having escaped from the demolished asylum, [were] running at random about the country.” While these reports were likely unfounded, the heightened fear of looters and criminals preying on devestated communities could be seen in numerous official documents and public flyers warning the public to be vigilant.

    After the earthquake though, the hospital was rebuilt in a more low-rise, Mediterranean Revival style similar to the State Normal School (now San Jose State University). The hospital was then reopened in 1911 as the Agnews State Mental Hospital. The state hospital continued its service to the community until the mid-1970s, when the passage of the Laterman Act (1971) transferred mental health treatment programs to local communities in an attempt to provide better care. This led the state to close many state hospitals throughout the state, including Agnews

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