Presidio La Bahía

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This fort, originally founded in 1721, was the site of many Texas Revolution conflicts including the Battle of Goliad and the Goliad Massacre. Folks have reported seeing ghostly massacred soldiers and hearing their cries of pain.

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    Geographic Information

    Address:
    Lopez Road
    Goliad, TX
    United States

    Get Directions »
    GPS:
    28.6476667, -97.38309140000001
    County:
    Goliad County, Texas
    Nearest Towns:
    Goliad, TX (1.5 mi.)
    Nordheim, TX (23.3 mi.)
    Yorktown, TX (24.1 mi.)
    Refugio, TX (24.5 mi.)
    Victoria, TX (25.4 mi.)
    Pettus, TX (25.5 mi.)
    Normanna, TX (25.5 mi.)
    Tuleta, TX (25.7 mi.)
    Runge, TX (25.8 mi.)
    Tulsita, TX (26.3 mi.)

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    Comments (3)

    1. Michael Connelly  |  

      I investigated the Presidio in July 2010. I did an EVP session in the Chapel to try to make contact with the spirit of a monk who has been seen. I did not know at the time that Colonel James Fannin had been executed right outside of the Chapel. I took some pictures and asked to speak to anyone who was there. Because it was a hot July day I prepared to leave the chapel when suddenly the hair on the back of my neck stood up and I felt the temperature drop at least 30 degrees. I switched my recorder back on and said what I was experiencing and then said “Is that you Col. Fannin? When I played the recording back I heard a clear response stating “I’m here”. At the time, I was wearing my U.S. Army veteran cap and believe I got the response because Col. Fannin was responding to a fellow soldier. The full story is in my book “America’s Liveliest Ghosts”

    2. I have visited this place several times. All of the times I have been there, I have never seen anything out of the ordinary,but I have felt a strong sense or a strong feeling of sadness as i walked the field inside the walls. As I came near the area of where Fannin was executed, I was overwhelmed with a sad feeling. My wife felt the same thing and she also noticed a cold spot right next to a cannon that is under a makeshift roof in the field inside the walls. We walked the entire field and came across this cannon and we felt a cold spot which was odd because it was 98 degrees outside. Anyway, I recommend anyone to visit this place,it is history and just down the street, you can also visit the hanging tree which is right next to the court house.

    3. I live in La Bahia, our house is on old presidio grounds, and though I’ve never seen anything my family and I have heard disembodied voices speaking in Spanish, heard cannon shots and have smelled gun and cannon smoke.
      Not frequent, but a handful of times since we’ve lived here.
      Pretty cool.

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