Union Station

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Union Station’s busiest time was during World War II, when 300 passengers came through per day. Its ghosts are believed to have come from this time. Suggs Mailer is the most well-known spirit here, a man whose job it was to transfer mail from underground trains to the post office by way of a hand-powered truck. After he retired, the man mysteriously disappeared, never to be heard from again. His shadow has been seen in the basement. Employees also say a ghostly lady in a black dress walks down the stairs after hours, and other apparitions carrying suitcases have been seen in the hallways. A phantom train whistle also has been heard.

If you've had a paranormal experience here, or have any additional information about this location, please let us know!



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    Geographic Information

    Address:
    30 W Pershing Rd
    Kansas City, MO 64108
    United States

    Get Directions »
    GPS:
    39.085078, -94.58573000000001
    County:
    Jackson County, Missouri
    Nearest Towns:
    Kansas City, MO (1.1 mi.)
    Kansas City, KS (3.0 mi.)
    North Kansas City, MO (3.4 mi.)
    Westwood Hills, KS (3.4 mi.)
    Westwood, KS (3.5 mi.)
    Mission Woods, KS (3.7 mi.)
    Roeland Park, KS (4.1 mi.)
    Mission Hills, KS (4.9 mi.)
    Fairway, KS (5.0 mi.)
    Avondale, MO (5.2 mi.)

    Contact Information

    Web:
    http://www.unionstation.org/

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    Comments (7)

    1. This building has a LOT of history. When my mother was a kid, she used to go with my grandmother to pick up my great aunt from the train. When they had the Titanic display back in the late 90s or so, patrons would comment on the staff dressed in period clothing. The staff said nobody was dressed like that. It’s also within walking distance of Union Cemetery, Crown Center and Liberty Memorial, which is directly across the street. In the walkway that connects Crown Center to Union Station, so you can avoid traffic, has pictures of the train station in it’s heyday IN ADDITION to the renovation and the tools the workers used. If you ever visit Kansas or Missouri, make sure Union Station is on your list.

    2. I was there this past July. I went into the ladies’ restroom and felt like someone else was in there even though I was alone. I was washing my hands and one of the sinks at the other end of the row turned on by itself and turned off. I got out of there fast!

        • Since there doesn’t seem to be a way to edit my comments, the correct number of daily passenger trains per day in 1945 was around 180. Sorry about the error.

    3. When i was there i was in the ladies restroom and i went to go wash my hands and a stall was shut as if someone was in there and then i heard someone peeing and then the toilet flushed. And then the stall door opend and no on walked out, no one was in there. I ran out… I haven’t been there since.

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    Disclaimer: The stories posted here are user-submitted and are, in the nature of "ghost stories," largely unverifiable. HauntedPlaces.org makes no claims that any of the statements posted here are factually accurate. The vast majority of information provided on this web site is anecdotal, and as such, should be viewed in the same light as local folklore and urban legends.