Tug Hill Annie

You are here Home  > Miscellaneous >  Tug Hill Annie

Tug Hill Annie was born as Anna Joan Machowski in 1917, and she is the subject of a popular ghost legend in these parts. By her twenties she found herself married to a man called Alfred with four children, but she wasn’t happy, and took to drink. One night in 1954, while on a wine run, she was killed and decapitated in a car accident. Since then, a female ghost has occasionally been seen walking along Sears Pond Road. Over the years, the ghost has acquired the nickname Tug Hill Annie.

If you've had a paranormal experience here, or have any additional information about this location, please let us know!



Rate this Haunted Place

What do you think? Is this place really haunted? Voice your opinion here! Click "thumbs up" if you think its haunted, or "thumbs down" if you think its all just a tall tale.


Geographic Information

Address:
Sears Pond Road
East of Liberty Road
Montague, NY
United States

Get Directions »
GPS:
43.73717567592507, -75.70539700969681
County:
Lewis County, New York
Nearest Towns:
Copenhagen, NY (10.7 mi.)
Lowville, NY (11.7 mi.)
Lorraine, NY (12.1 mi.)
Rodman, NY (13.4 mi.)
Castorland, NY (14.4 mi.)
Adams, NY (15.9 mi.)
Adams Center, NY (16.5 mi.)
West Carthage, NY (16.8 mi.)
Pierrepont Manor, NY (17.0 mi.)
Carthage, NY (17.2 mi.)

close

Please note: It is your responsibility to acquire appropriate permissions before investigating any location listed on this site. Private property should be respected at all times, as should all posted signs concerning trespassing, hours of operation and other local regulations. Many "ghost hunters" have been arrested because they failed to contact property owners and/or local authorities ahead of time.

Share Your Experiences

Close Comments

Comments (6)

  1. There isn’t a trace of doubt in my mind that the story of “Tug Hill Annie” is absolutely true. And until at least 2012, she continued to inhabit the area. I believe that she may have now crossed-over. But only time will be the true test. When I was a very young child, my father took me to view the wrecked truck ( note that the info above incorrectly mentions a car ) when it was towed into nearby Lowville. To this day, it isn’t known for certain who was actually driving I touched the fender and felt her presence. Research I have done over the years has only strengthened my belief. And Annie’s grave is only a few feet away from that of my parents. This tale is TRUE !

  2. Addendum: I note that the map accompanying this item is incorrect by about one half mile. You will notice a second curve to the East ( to the maps right ). THAT is the actual curve that the truck failed to negotiate and was the site of the fatal accident. Don’t want to nit-pick – just make sure the record is correct. Thank you.

  3. My husband and I bought our camp 1 year ago just a quarter mile from there. And my husband has seen her one night. He went out to stand in the road to get a cell signal and looked down the road and seen her.

    • My significant-other lives on Sears-Pond road, actually she lives almost across from a camp, possibly yours?
      My 12th grade English teacher told me and my class a story about an encounter with Tug Hill Annie on this road. She was on a bus taking a sports team to Lowville or something and the bus driver saw a pale woman in the middle of the road and slammed on the breaks. I think she said the lady moved slowly to the side of the road without moving her legs and just watched as the bus slowly passed by.

Share Your Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *



Have a photograph taken from this location? Use the "Browse" or "Choose File" button below to select an image to upload along with your comment.

 


Disclaimer: The stories posted here are user-submitted and are, in the nature of "ghost stories," largely unverifiable. HauntedPlaces.org makes no claims that any of the statements posted here are factually accurate. The vast majority of information provided on this web site is anecdotal, and as such, should be viewed in the same light as local folklore and urban legends.