The Conference House - Billop House

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The Conference House, aka Billop House, was built in 1680. It was the scene of a tragedy when in 1779 owner Christopher Billop, a British loyalist, accused a female servant of spying on him for the Colonists. She denied the charge, and Billop threw her down the stairs, breaking her neck. Apparitions of both Billop and the servant as well as British soldier ghosts are believed to haunt the premises. Neighbors have heard a man singing or shouting and a woman screaming and falling.

If you've had a paranormal experience here, or have any additional information about this location, please let us know!



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Geographic Information

Address:
298 Satterlee Street
Staten Island, NY
United States

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GPS:
40.5024125, -74.25148480000001
County:
Richmond County, New York
Nearest Towns:
Perth Amboy, NJ (0.8 mi.)
South Amboy, NJ (2.7 mi.)
Laurence Harbor, NJ (3.2 mi.)
Sewaren, NJ (3.5 mi.)
Fords, NJ (3.9 mi.)
Woodbridge, NJ (4.2 mi.)
Port Reading, NJ (4.4 mi.)
Cliffwood Beach, NJ (4.6 mi.)
Madison Park, NJ (4.6 mi.)
Sayreville Junction, NJ (4.9 mi.)

Contact Information

Web:
http://www.conferencehouse.org/

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Comments (2)

  1. I was at the Conference House with friends and their children at an Easter egg hunt around 1986. At some point my ex wife and I went inside to explore and to get out of the morning chill.

    We went downstairs and to the left where I opened a door to find a young man sitting in front of a fireplace at the far side of the room. He was smoking a long white clay pipe and staring at the fire which had a large copper kettle suspended over it. Even with the fire going, when I opened this door I felt a cold chill in the air.

    The man sensed our presence but waited half a minute before he got up and came over to us. He had the most realistic costume I had ever seen on a re-enactor, especially his shows which were made from leather pieces sewn together. His face was pallid and had occasional wisps of hair on his cheeks which looked like they would be plucked rather than shaved off.

    I started the exchange by “saying”, “This is great, do they pay you to dress up and come sit here or are you a volunteer?” He responded that he lived nearby and often came to this place because his friend worked here. He said he liked to explore the building and the grounds and had once discovered a tunnel underneath that supposedly went under the Kill to connect to Perth Amboy and was said to have been used by the Underground Railway. He said that it must have been sealed off because he hadn’t been able to find it lately.

    He terminated the exchange abruptly and went back to sit and smoke his pipe.

    A few years later I called to find out about these re-enactors and was told there were none. I asked the woman if there were any stories about ghosts and she said she had heard about ghosts at other sites in Staten Island but not at Conference House…….., that’s why I was happy to discover this site today.

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Disclaimer: The stories posted here are user-submitted and are, in the nature of "ghost stories," largely unverifiable. HauntedPlaces.org makes no claims that any of the statements posted here are factually accurate. The vast majority of information provided on this web site is anecdotal, and as such, should be viewed in the same light as local folklore and urban legends.