Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse

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The lighthouse is said to be haunted by a few spirits, one of which is said to be assistant lightkeeper Joseph Davis, who had a heart attack while working in 1919. The unexplained waft of kerosene sometimes detected here is attributed to his ghost. Kerosene has not been used in the lighthouse since 1933. Another haunt who resides here is believed to be a former lightkeeper’s son, who died after being kicked by a horse. His ghost plays pranks and opens and closes doors. Orbs also are said to appear around the grounds.

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    Geographic Information

    Address:
    4931 South Peninsula Drive
    Ponce Inlet, FL
    United States

    Get Directions »
    GPS:
    29.08069160122891, -80.92805781349182
    County:
    Volusia County, Florida
    Nearest Towns:
    Ponce Inlet, FL (1.2 mi.)
    New Smyrna Beach, FL (3.8 mi.)
    Glencoe, FL (4.6 mi.)
    Port Orange, FL (5.7 mi.)
    Edgewater, FL (6.5 mi.)
    Daytona Beach Shores, FL (7.4 mi.)
    South Daytona, FL (7.5 mi.)
    Samsula-Spruce Creek, FL (8.4 mi.)
    Daytona Beach, FL (10.7 mi.)
    Holly Hill, FL (13.1 mi.)

    Contact Information

    Web:
    http://ponceinlet.org/

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    Comments (6)

    1. The Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse is not haunted! There are no ghosts, pranksters or otherwise. The only pranksters are the people who put up this listing. As far as the odor of kerosene in the historic oil storage building, the old kerosene tanks that remain in the structure are the source of the smell. As for the ghostly fingers in April’s photo – that’s lace on the cuff.

    2. As I was back down the lighthouse tower after reaching the top I felt something Lift my hair and I went into a full panic attack trying to get back down the staircase. Crazy experience.

    3. I was in the lighthouse itself; climbing the steps. I kept feeling like I was being followed closely; but there was no one directly behind me like I felt.

    4. I’ve been here with my family and some aunts and uncles a number of times, most recently being probably 2002. One time we went there after dinner nearby at Down the Hatch, and of course we couldn’t go into any of the buildings because the facility was closed (it was almost 8 or 9pm), so we just walked around the grounds and looked at everything from the outside. I’m not one to really believe in ghosts, but as I stood off by myself in the center lawn I happened to look up at one of the second story windows of one of the outbuildings and I saw a white figure standing there. I looked away and looked back and it was gone. I’m not sure what I saw. I know it was not the reflection of any lights or anything like that.

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    Disclaimer: The stories posted here are user-submitted and are, in the nature of "ghost stories," largely unverifiable. HauntedPlaces.org makes no claims that any of the statements posted here are factually accurate. The vast majority of information provided on this web site is anecdotal, and as such, should be viewed in the same light as local folklore and urban legends.